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Sep 6 16

Planning Department’s Montgomery Modern Book Wins Award

by Christopher Peifer

montgomery modern cover

Book honored with first place in illustrated text category of 2016 Washington Publishers Book Design and Effectiveness Competition

SILVER SPRING, MDThe Montgomery County Planning Department, part of The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, has won first place for its book, Montgomery Modern: Modern Architecture in Montgomery County, Maryland, 1930-1979, in the illustrated text (small to medium nonprofit) category of the Washington Publishers’ 2016 Book Design and Effectiveness Competition.

The 250-page, well-illustrated book is written by Clare Lise Kelly, a preservation planner and an architectural historian with the Planning Department’s Historic Preservation Office. It includes an inventory of key midcentury modern buildings and communities, and biographical sketches of the architects and developers who created them. The book was designed by Robert L. Wiser and edited by Nicole Diehlmann, and includes the color photography of Carol M. Highsmith.

The Washington Publishers Book Design and Effectiveness Competition recognizes excellence in bookmaking across the greater Washington, DC book publishing community. The competition’s judges evaluate the excellence of each book’s design and effectiveness in achieving the publisher’s goals, meeting the readers’ needs and reaching its market. Prizes are awarded in 15 categories, five designs for each of the three publisher categories – plus best of show.

The Planning Department will receive the award at a ceremony being held on Friday, September 23 at the Resource and Conservation Building in Washington, DC.

For more on the Department’s Montgomery Modern program and for information on how to purchase Montgomery Modern: Modern Architecture in Montgomery County, Maryland, 1930-1979, consult our web site.

Sep 2 16

Planning Department Co-Sponsors October 8 Bus Tour of Modern Homes and Buildings Designed by Architects Deigert and Yerkes

by Christopher Peifer

montgomery_modern_final
Itinerary includes houses in the Tulip Hill and Oak Spring neighborhoods, The Primary Day School and Cedar Lane Unitarian Church

SILVER SPRING, MDThe Montgomery County Planning Department, part of The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, is co-sponsoring a bus tour of midcentury modern houses and buildings in the County on Saturday, October 8 from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The event is being organized with Docomomo-DC and the Potomac Valley chapter of the American Institute of Architects as part of Docomomo-United States’ national tour day, titled “Modernism in Your Backyard.”

The tour will be led by preservation planner and architectural historian Clare Lise Kelly, who is the author of the Planning Department’s award-winning book, Montgomery Modern: Modern Architecture in Montgomery County, Maryland, 1930-1979.

The bus tour will explore the Montgomery County work of Deigert and Yerkes, a leading modernist architecture firm in the Washington, DC area, best known for the National Arboretum Administration Building The partnership of Robert Campbell Deigert and David Norton Yerkes, which operated from 1947 to 1967, created distinctive designs characterized by their variety in materials and textures, surprising angles and contrasting spaces.

On the itinerary are the rustic modern houses of Tulip Hill (1950-55) and Oak Spring (1966), lunch at The Primary Day School (1955) and a concluding reception at Pietro Belluschi’s Cedar Lane Unitarian Church (1958). Bus pickup and drop-off is at the Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro Kiss and Ride.

Tickets for the tour cost $50 per person and $40 for members of Potomac Valley chapter of AIA and Docomomo-DC. They can be purchased here.

Learn more about the Planning Department’s Montgomery Modern programs.

May 18 16

Planning Department Celebrates May as Preservation Month

by Bridget Schwiesow

HistoricPreservationMonthGroup 5-17-16

Online map and Montgomery Modern initiative represent County’s strong commitment to historic preservation

SILVER SPRING, MD – The Montgomery County Planning Department, part of The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, joins the County Council in celebrating historic preservation following the County Council’s recognition of May as Preservation Month in Montgomery County. On May 17, 2016, Councilmember Hans Riemer introduced the proclamation by praising the efforts of the Montgomery County Historic Preservation Commission.

The Planning Department’s Historic Preservation Section supports the Planning Board and the Historic Preservation Commission by assisting with the identification, designation, and regulation of historic sites in Montgomery County, and through the administration of a number of preservation initiatives.

“I want to thank Councilmember Riemer and the rest of the County Council for this proclamation,” said Historic Preservation Commission Chairman William Kirwan. “It is important that County residents are reminded of the significance of preserving our cultural heritage here in Montgomery County, and I believe that no Preservation Month theme could send a clearer, stronger message: This Place Matters.”

The theme of “This Place Matters” has been echoed by the Planning Department’s Historic Preservation office’s efforts in continuing to administer the county’s tax credit program for historically designated properties and through recent initiatives such as Montgomery Modern and the development of an interactive map of historic African American places in the County.

About the Montgomery County Planning Department’s Historic Preservation Office
The Historic Preservation Office supports the Planning Board and the Historic Preservation Commission by providing for the identification, designation, and regulation of historic sites in Montgomery County. Historic Preservation staff also maintains an archive and library of documentation on historic resources in Montgomery County and provides preservation outreach and guidance on preservation best practices to the public.

If you are specifically interested in historic buildings, sites, and programs in Montgomery County Parks, please visit Montgomery Parks.

Review the Places from the Past book produced by the Montgomery County Planning Department Historic Preservation Office which inventories designated historic sites and districts in the County.

Learn more about research and designation by the Historic Preservation Office.

Apr 1 16

Montgomery Modern Book Wins Award from County Preservation Group

by Bridget Schwiesow

Montgomery Modern Cover

Montgomery Preservation Inc. honors book that documents County’s mid-20th-century architecture and neighborhoods for demonstrating excellence in heritage education

SILVER SPRING, MD – The Montgomery County Planning Department, part of The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, is pleased to announce that its book, Montgomery Modern: Modern Architecture in Montgomery County, Maryland, 1930-1979, has been honored with a 2015 Montgomery County Award for Historic Preservation.  The award was presented by Montgomery Preservation Inc. for demonstrating excellence in heritage education at a ceremony at the Sandy Spring Museum on March 25, 2016.

The 250-page, well-illustrated book is written by Clare Lise Kelly, a preservation planner and an architectural historian with the Planning Department’s Historic Preservation Office. The book includes an inventory of key buildings and communities, and biographical sketches of architects and developers.

Montgomery Modern is surely destined to become an invaluable reference guide to modernist design, planning, construction and – hopefully – preservation of Montgomery County’s mid-century heritage,” said Jerry McCoy, president of the Silver Spring Historical Society, at the award ceremony. “One hopes this book will rekindle popular appreciation for modernism and help raise awareness of the value of modern resources, and to ensure that this significant part of our architectural heritage will remain for the benefit of generations to come.”

About Montgomery Modern

The publication of Montgomery Modern: Modern Architecture in Montgomery County, Maryland, 1930-1979 is part of the Historic Preservation Office’s award-winning Montgomery Modern initiative to educate the public about the architectural heritage of Montgomery County. This preservation program has included a bus tour, bike tour and other outreach events dedicated to the wealth of mid-century modern architecture in the County. Learn more about the Historic Preservation Office’s Montgomery Modern initiative.
Montgomery Modern: Modern Architecture in Montgomery County, Maryland, 1930-1979, written by M-NCPPC senior architectural historian Clare Lise Kelly, provides the historic context for modern architecture in Montgomery County, Maryland, from its first appearance in the 1930s through the 1970s. Richly illustrated with images by DC photographer Carol Highsmith, period photographs and architectural renderings, the book is organized by building types set within four main time periods.

Biographical sketches of practitioners (architects, landscape architects, developers, planners) are included, as well as an inventory of key projects, including buildings and subdivisions. Montgomery Modern is intended to raise awareness about the significance of modern architecture and the fragile nature of the built environment from the recent past.

May 20 08

Log Cabin Restoration to be Subject of Montgomery County Historic Preservation Program

by Valerie Berton

SILVER SPRING, MD – History buffs and others interested in Montgomery County’s historic log cabins, which date back to the 1700s, should mark their calendars for a cabin restoration presentation on Sunday, June 1 at historic Oakley Cabin, Brookeville.

The program will be led by Hank Handler of Oak Grove Restoration, Inc., who restored Oakley Cabin after a devastating arson fire in 1988. Oakley Cabin is owned by the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission and is part of Reddy Branch Stream Valley Park. Handler will describe the techniques that brought Oakley Cabin back to life, including log cabin construction and antique carpentry tools, many of which are displayed in a new permanent exhibit there.

Oakley Cabin was built in the 1820s to house enslaved African Americans. It later became part of a freed African American roadside community. Today, the cabin is furnished to represent post-slavery life and is interpreted by trained volunteers.

M-NCPPC historic preservation planners estimate Montgomery County is home to about 20 log houses, even though they were the dominant house wherever good timber was available after  Swedish immigrants brought the design to the New World in the 1630s. Log cabins can be small one-room buildings or as big as two stories with four rooms and two chimneys.

Oakley Cabin’s tool collection includes woodworking implements that were prized possessions of early settlers. The only tools actually needed to build a log cabin were an axe and a saw. A maul for hammering logs into place, specialized axes, a measuring tape and plumb line were used by more experienced carpenters. Since carpenters once lived in Oakley Cabin, preservationists from M-NCPPC, funded with various State and Local Grants given and Friends of Oakley Cabin and the Underground Railroad, created a permanent exhibit of antique carpentry tools last year.

Oakley Cabin is open Saturdays from noon to 4 p.m. from April through October.

WHO:     Hank Handler on log cabin restoration

WHAT:     Log cabin restoration presentation

WHEN:      3-4 p.m. Sunday, June 1

Aug 8 05

2006 Historic Preservation Grants Available – Deadline is September 30

by MNCPPC

SILVER SPRING, MD – The Montgomery County Historic Preservation Commission staff is accepting applications until September 30 for matching-fund grants, totaling $30,000, for local preservation projects to be completed in 2006.

Projects eligible for consideration include, but are not limited to: development and installation of historic district signs; walking tours of historic districts; handbooks or design guidelines; explanatory brochures for owners in historic districts; historic site brochures; feasibility studies for restoration or preservation of buildings, sites and historical artifacts owned or under the custody of non-profit groups; and public education projects such as historical and archeological surveys, slide/tape shows, lectures, videos, oral history taping/transcriptions, photographic displays or other types of exhibits on county history, and oral histories.

For applications and guidelines, contact Susan Soderberg, The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, 8787 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910, call 301-563-3400 or e-mail to Susan.Soderberg@mncppc-mc.org. Applicants may submit completed forms to the same address postmarked no later than Tuesday, September 30, 2005.

All applicants must match the grants in money or in-kind services. Grant winners must carry adequate insurance, as specified by the county’s General Conditions of Contract, Article 15, and they must sign a contract with M-NCPPC. The Historic Preservation Commission will notify applicants of their selection by Friday, October 31, 2005.